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1950’s photo 1950''s Bridge Street. Lorry loaded with carboy''s, The gap between the terrace houses was the entrance to Francis Street. This was a part of the Marley Estate.
Thanks to Portadown photographs for the photo.
My father E Matchett took part in this race anyone know any of the others April 1956

High Street Easter Tuesday Cycle race passing through town Easter Tuesday.
Who remembers this character? 1967.

Locally well known ''Badger Hamill'' having a stroll in what was to be the last sight of John Street
Watson Street Portadown Who can name any of these people. The photograph was taking In Watson Street in the back ground yo can see the old railway station
Gaslights on the bridge In this photograph thanks to Portadown photographs you see the old gaslights. When you read a bit about the actual bridge it started as a wooden bridge and progressed to what it is today. The Gasworks book will be coming soon
A blast from the past Who remembers this street before it was knocked down?
Killicomaine celebrating 60year in 2014 The picture show the children of Cullen''s Row '' Noel and Kenneth Carville, Seamus McNeill, Sammy Irwin, the McNeill girls and Harry Irwin. Published: 10:00 Tuesday 10 June 2014 Share this article Last Saturday was ‘Diamond’ occasion for Killicomaine housing estate – it’s 60 years since it was officially opened by none other than Lord Wakehurst, Governor of Northern Ireland in those days when Portadown was developing at a rate of knots. The venue for the celebrations was the Jubilee Centre, with attractions ranging from football to 1940s-1950s harmony – Andrews Sisters type upbeat rhythms provided by the acclaimed trio ‘Swingabella’ who beautifully replicate the wonderful close-harmony sound. It was organised by the hard-working residents’ group, and everyone attending will be given the commemorative leaflet, recalling the days prior to the building of the estate when it was a verdant rural area – Princess Way for example was just a country lane, then known as ‘Cullen’s Row’. Local resident Harrison Morrow remembers the bulldozers moving in to widen the ‘Way’ as a precursor to the building of the estate – one of several built in the post-war era, including Woodside, Baltylum, Corcrain, Brownstown, and later Churchill Park and Ballyoran. They were by Portadown Borough Council and the NI Housing Trust, both taken over in the 1970s by the NI Housing Executive. But we’re concentrating on Killicomaine - Sixty years ago – on June 12, 1954 - the then Governor of Northern Ireland, Lord Lakehurst, unveiled a plaque on the bus shelter at ‘The Square’, declaring open the Killicomaine estate.

Read more at: https://www.portadowntimes.co.uk/news/fond-memories-of-the-beginning-of-killicomaine-1-6102330
The Bann Bridge A photograph taken from the Bann Boulevard photograph courtesy of Portadown pictures
Riots in Portadown The House of Commons held an enquiry into riots that happened in Portadown in 1900. Information courtesy of HC reports.

PORTADOWN RIOTS.

HC Deb 06 March 1900 vol 80 c217217
§MR. PATRICK O''BRIEN (Kilkenny) I beg to ask Mr. Attorney General for Ireland whether he is now ina position to state the cause, and effect on the property of Roman Catholics in Portadown, of the Orange riot which took place there in celebration of the relief of Ladysmith on Wednesday last.
§MR. ATKINSON The streets of Portadown, like those of other towns in Ulster, were the scene of considerable enthusiasm and excitement when it became known on Wednesday last that Ladysmith had been relieved. It is much to be regretted, however, that amongst the crowds of loyalists who assembled on the occasion in Portadown, there were, unfortunately, a number of persons, mainly boys, who indulged in stone-throwing and breaking the windows in houses the property of Roman Catholics. Windows in the houses of Protestants were afterwards broken by Roman Catholics. The extent of damage done to the houses of Roman Catholics was about £10. No person, I am happy to say, was injured on the occasion, and the respectable inhabitants of the town, in order to mark their disapproval of the reprehensible conduct of these individuals, intend, so I am informed, to have the damage done to windows repaired at their own expense. For some years past every celebration in Portadown has passed off without unpleasant incident. Some eight or nine of the persons who threw the stones on this occasion have been identified, and will be rigorously proceeded against by the police.
Edenderry Arch Who remembers the old arch at Edenderry.
Photo courtesy of Pinterest

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Last 5 Additions

1950’s photo
1950’s photo

1950''s Bridge Street. Lorry loaded with carboy''s, The gap between the terrace houses was the entrance to Francis Street. This was a part of the Marley Estate.
Thanks to Portadown photographs for the photo.
My father E Matchett took part in this race anyone know any of the others
My father E Matchett took part in this race anyone know any of the others

April 1956

High Street Easter Tuesday Cycle race passing through town Easter Tuesday.
Who remembers this character?
Who remembers this character?

1967.

Locally well known ''Badger Hamill'' having a stroll in what was to be the last sight of John Street
Watson Street Portadown
Watson Street Portadown

Who can name any of these people. The photograph was taking In Watson Street in the back ground yo can see the old railway station
Gaslights on the bridge
Gaslights on the bridge

In this photograph thanks to Portadown photographs you see the old gaslights. When you read a bit about the actual bridge it started as a wooden bridge and progressed to what it is today. The Gasworks book will be coming soon

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