Edenderry Cultural and Historical Society
�




Click on one of the Titles below to download that article.


Title Description
Cardwell McClure to give a talk on his uncle Our Chairman Cardwell McClure has-been invited by the directors of Sloan''s House, Loughgall, County Armagh to give a talk on the life of his uncle, William Scott CBE RA who lived for a short time in Enniskillen, and show the film on Scott''s life - ''Every Picture Tells A Story'', produced by his cousin, James Scott.

William Scott had a link to Portadown/Orange Order. To find out more about the linkeage I invite you to attend this event. The presentation and film would be of interest to those school children in the County taking A or GCSE levels in art this year therefore I would encourage them to attend.

William Scott is now recognised as one of the great British/Ulster artists of the 20th century.

On display will be many books written on the artist, details of his works and where they can be seen in Ireland with images of the paintings and an Orange Order banner painted by William and his father, my grandfather in 1927. The banner would be unique and rare because the hand of such a great artist is upon it. It is signed Scott Enniskillen.

This event is not to be missed.
Mrs Joan Christie receiving her award Congratulations to Mrs Joan Christie the Lord Lieutenant of Co.Antrim
Members talking to the Lord Lieutenant of Co. Antrim Last year the Society had the pleasure in attending an award ceremony at Carrickfergus Gasworks Museum (Flame) in their award of the Queens Voluntary Award and in so met the Lord Lieutenant of Co. Antrim Mrs Joan Christie we would like to wish her well both in her retirement and in getting The Freedom of Lisburn City and Castlereagh. See photos of some of the members talking to The Lord Lieutenant.
St Marks Church Portadown The town church with the old gas light
Edenderry Arch Can I ask everyone if you know of any of the people in the Arch photographs please let us know
West Street Arch If only we could go back to times of no troubles.
Parkmount Arch Another for our collection. Remembering a time of less troubles and a time we’re everyone helped each other.
Another losted Arch of Portadown This photograph portrays the Arch that used to be Corcrain, Portadown. We often forget when these were put up originally it wasn’t about religion everyone helped in putting it up and taking it down. People lived together, worked together and grew up together. We need to look at our past not over the troubles but beforehand to move forward.
One of the great Ulster railways One of the greats
Talk on saving the turf Join us for the next lecture of our 2018/2019 programme which will see Dr. Liam Campbell of the Lough Neagh Landscape Partnership provide an illustrated talk on turf, a resource long dug and valued locally from the bogs of the Montiaghs, Birches and Brackagh.

Entitled ''Saving the Turf - Past Uses and Future Value'', Liam has very kindly produced the following synopsis of his talk:

"When I was a child growing up in Donegal, a phrase that was commonly used to sum up someone’s stubbornness, rudeness, or more often stupidity was, “You can take the man out of the bog but you cannot take the bog out of the man.” The study of the nature of the bogs of Ireland is therefore interwoven with the story of human presence and human perception of that nature in Ireland. In 1685, William King—later to become Archbishop of Dublin— published “Of the Bogs and Loughs of Ireland” in Philosophical Transactions, in which he calls Irish bogs “infamous” and equates extensive bogland with barbarity. The bogs offered an advantage to resistant natives, who, King believed, deliberately built near them: the bogs “are a shelter and a refuge to tories [dispossessed natives turned outlaws], and thieves, who can hardly live without them.” For Elizabethan colonists, the prospect (or actual view) of bogland from the English Pale was, as it were, the ground-level reality of Irish nature, very different from the colonial prospect (or anticipated view) of Ireland from England. Gerard Boate’s Ireland’s Natural History (1652) writes of the reason for the extent of our bogs: “now wonder if a country, famous for laziness as Ireland is, abound with them.” There is indeed a long history of colonial writing on the nature and culture of bogs.

This talk will look at how the bogs, the moor, the moss or whatever it’s called locally, affects me and others and has done through the ages but as we enter a crucial age for the planets survival we can all learn to love the bog that has too often been denigrated, feared and despised.

The bogs of Ireland are our Amazon forest and a library of knowledge and preservation in so many ways. The bog has been a subtle theme in modern Irish history, extending to political and cultural issues as well as permeating social and economic ones. This talk hope to uncover a picture richer in detail and more complex in its development than traditional images of the bog question in Ireland would suggest. It is both timely, given the current political and environmental debates, and it is original in its exploration of how colonization and its legacy overlap in many forms of exploitation."

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 next

Last 5 Additions

Cardwell McClure to give a talk on his uncle
Cardwell McClure to give a talk on his uncle

Our Chairman Cardwell McClure has-been invited by the directors of Sloan''s House, Loughgall, County Armagh to give a talk on the life of his uncle, William Scott CBE RA who lived for a short time in Enniskillen, and show the film on Scott''s life - ''Every Picture Tells A Story'', produced by his cousin, James Scott.

William Scott had a link to Portadown/Orange Order. To find out more about the linkeage I invite you to attend this event. The presentation and film would be of interest to those school children in the County taking A or GCSE levels in art this year therefore I would encourage them to attend.

William Scott is now recognised as one of the great British/Ulster artists of the 20th century.

On display will be many books written on the artist, details of his works and where they can be seen in Ireland with images of the paintings and an Orange Order banner painted by William and his father, my grandfather in 1927. The banner would be unique and rare because the hand of such a great artist is upon it. It is signed Scott Enniskillen.

This event is not to be missed.
Mrs Joan Christie receiving her award
Mrs Joan Christie receiving her award

Congratulations to Mrs Joan Christie the Lord Lieutenant of Co.Antrim
Members talking to the Lord Lieutenant of Co. Antrim
Members talking to the Lord Lieutenant of Co. Antrim

Last year the Society had the pleasure in attending an award ceremony at Carrickfergus Gasworks Museum (Flame) in their award of the Queens Voluntary Award and in so met the Lord Lieutenant of Co. Antrim Mrs Joan Christie we would like to wish her well both in her retirement and in getting The Freedom of Lisburn City and Castlereagh. See photos of some of the members talking to The Lord Lieutenant.
St Marks Portadown
St Marks Portadown

St Marks Church Portadown with the old gas light
St Marks Church Portadown
St Marks Church Portadown

The town church with the old gas light

Total Hits: 25590 © copyright 2017 Edenderry Cultural and Historical Society